TWC hosts ten schools in Science Olympiad competition

Posted on: March 19, 2012

Saturday Tennessee Wesleyan College hosted Science Olympiad, a science-based competition that more than 6,200 teams from 50 U.S. states compete in each year. Student teams from four middle schools and six high schools competed in 23 open science events that tested their practical skill and understanding of science and engineering.

Saturday Tennessee Wesleyan College hosted Science Olympiad, a science-based competition that more than 6,200 teams from 50 U.S. states compete in each year. Student teams from four middle schools and six high schools competed in 23 open science events that tested their practical skill and understanding of science and engineering.

From robot arms to forensic testing, students from across Tennessee competed at the regional level with three middle schools and two high schools advancing to the state competition. The middle schools that will advance are first place winner Bearden Middle School, second place winner Cedar Springs Home School Group and third place winner Mountain View Middle School. The high schools that will advance are first place winner Bearden High School and second place winner Cedar Springs Home School Group.

The Science Olympiad regionals in Tennessee were initially held at Maryville College in Maryville, Tenn., but have been hosted by TWC in recent years.

“Science Olympiad is one of the best events out there that promotes science, math and engineering,” said John Berch, assistant professor of chemistry at TWC. “I competed in Science Olympiad as a young student and the competition taught me the fundamentals of science.”

Berch advocated for TWC to host the Science Olympiad regional, organizing the event when it is held at the college.

“The great thing about Science Olympiad is that they actually promote variety,” said Berch. “The rules are the perimeter of the event. You can do anything you want as long as you stay within those perimeters. It’s not like Quiz Bowl where you study for tests. This is a hands-on, practical use of science.”

After a long day of competing in events, students gathered in Townsend Memorial Hall, chanting “We love science yes we do, we love science how about you?” in anticipation of the awards ceremony. Berch announced the awards as TWC President Harley Knowles handed out medals and trophies to the winning students and schools.

“I like Science Olympiad because it’s challenging,” said John Owen Finley, a student-competitor from the Cedar Springs Home School Group. “You get to break stuff and play with acid which is fun but you also get to meet smart people who are your peers and share your interests.”

This year’s state competition, Tennessee Science Olympiad, will be held at the University of Tennessee Knoxville on April 14.