Syllabus C 101

I.

COURSE:

C 101

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

4 c.h..



C 101L
 

 GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB

0 c.h..


CLASS LOCATION:


Lecture:  Fisher 219 MWF 11:00-11:50 A.M. and
Labs:      F 207  Wed.  2:00 P.M. & Thurs. 2:30 P.M.


 

II.

TERM:  

Fall, 2011


INSTRUCTOR: 

Dr. Joyce R. Baker


OFFICE:

Fisher 215


PHONE:

423-746-5233


E-MAIL:

jrbaker@twcnet.edu




URL

 www.twcnet.edu/jrbaker


OFFICE HOURS:  

MWF 8:00-8:50 and TTh 8:30-10:30 or by appointment


III.    COURSE DESCRIPTION:  A study of the fundamental concepts of atoms and molecules, periodic relationships, chemic bonding and thermochemistry.  This sequence is a prerequisite for all other chemistry courses.  For this course, Pre-calculus (M141) or Calculus (M181) are pre- or co-requisites

IV.   COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING OUTCOMES
      

1.    Effectively use the skills of reading, writing and speaking. **
      2.    Recognize the issues that affect social and political behavior in their historical and cultural perspective.
      3.    Recognize and analyze contributions of the arts and literature.
      4.    Demonstrate mathematical computation skills, and basic computer applications skills and demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method.**
      5.    Think critically and develop a basis for effective judgment.
      6.    Access and evaluate information and its sources and use information effectively to accomplish a purpose.  **

        **  college-wide learning outcomes covered in this course

V.   COURSE GOALS & OBJECTIVES/COMPETENCIES/SKILLS:
        To define chemical terms
        To solve chemical problems at a higher cognitive level
        To explain modern-day theories and illustrate their development
   
        More specifically:
        A.    Explain atomic structure and the development of atomic theory.
        B.    Explain the use of the periodic table of the elements in predicting the formula of a      
                compound.
        C.    Describe the differences between covalent and ionic bonding and the different properties of compounds formed by each.
        D.    Explain stoichiometry, solutions and the quantitative calculations of concentrations.
        E.    Apply mathematics, including calculus, to investigations in chemistry and the analysis of data.


VI.    COURSE RELATIONSHIP TO MAJOR PROGRAM & DEPARTMENTAL OR INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSES:
        To discover the impact of science and technology in their daily living
        To serve as a foundation for additional chemistry courses
        To demonstrate mathematical skills
        To use effective communication skills
        To meet ACR requirements and B.S. chemistry major requirements.
   
VI.    COURSE RELATIONSHIP TO CONTENT AREA KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS FROM THE EDUCATION MATRICES:
        The matrices for this course can be found at http://www.twcnet.edu/jrbaker/c-101-general-chemistry-i/matrices/

VIII.  TEXT AND OTHER REQUIRED RESOURCES:  
        Zumdahl & Zumdahl, Chemistry, 8th. edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2010.

IX.    TOPICS OR UNITS OF INSTRUCTION:  Stoichiometry, Chemical Reactions, Gases, Thermochemistry, Atomic Structure & Periodicity, and Chemical Bonding (i.e., Chapters 1-9)

X.    ADDITIONAL READINGS:    None required except in lab.
    
XI.    METHODS OF INSTRUCTION and LEARNING:
        Lectures, videotapes, laboratory, computer tutorials, graphical analysis, problem solving, homework, collaborative learning groups, guided learning inquiry and tests

XII A.    REQUIREMENTS OF STUDENTS:  Classroom and laboratory attendance and participation, reading assigned material, problem solving, homework, guided learning inquiries, and collaborative learning experiences in classroom and laboratory.

XII B.

MEANS OF EVALUATION:

Fall 2011


Hour exams that require definitions and explanations:  

100 pt. each


Laboratory attendance and participation:  

100 pt.


Total points possible: 

600 pt.

     

XII C.

Test Schedule:    



Chapters 1 & 2

Sept. 2


Chapters 3 

Sept. 23


Chapters 4 & 5  

Oct.  12


Chapters 6 & 7    

Oct. 31


Chapters 8 & 9

Nov. 21


During the final exam period, each student will have an opportunity to take a new test over a previous exam
of his or her choice.    

Dec. 2

 

XII D

 GRADING SCALE       


        




100.0-94.0%

A


76.9-73.0%  

C


93.9-90.0%

A-


72.9-70.0%

C-


89.9-87.0%

B+


69.6-67.0%      

D+


86.9-83.0%  

B


66.9-63.0%

D


82.9-80.0%  

B-


62.9-60.0

D-


79.9-77.0%

C+


 60.0-   0%    

F


XII E.    HOMEWORK:    Homework problems will be assigned each class period but are not graded.   These assignments are to assist in your studies and preparations for exams. Assignments will be reviewed at the beginning of the next class.
            If you miss class, assignments can be found at www.twcnet.edu/jrbaker/


XII.F    
ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING OUTCOMES  

Learning Outcome

Measurement

Assessment

To use effectively the skills of reading, writing and speaking.

Reading: Student will read the textbook, handouts, and assignments.
Writing: Student will complete written exams with each exams containing at least one essay question.  There will also be writing required in the lab notebook.
Speaking: Student will participate in class discussions and share answers with the class using the Smartboard.
Listening: Student will attend class, participate in lecture and exercises, and follow verbal instructions regarding homework, quizzes and other assignments.

The student will be assessed on the effectiveness of these four skills as all of the graded course components will require use of these skills

Learning Outcome

Measurement

Assessment

To demonstrate mathematical computation skills, and basic computer applications skills and demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method.

Mathematical skills: Student will complete multiple types of calculations provided through lecture, handouts, quizzes, homework and examinations.
Scientific Method:  Student will complete an esaay question and apply concepts on an exam.

Assessment of Mathematical skills will be done through class examinations
Assessment of the Scientific Method will primarily be through an essay on the first exam where students will be required to present the facts and may also be asked to intrepet data. A rubric developed by the Natural Sciences Dept. will be used for evaluation.

         

XII G.     ATTENDANCE POLICY:  Attendance is required. If a test is missed because of illness, a make-up test must be taken within a week of the return to classes.
             If a test is missed because of an official school function, the test must be taken before the scheduled test date and will not count as an absence.  Laboratory attendance and participation are required. Changes in dates of tests announced in class will take priority over what is printed in this syllabus.
             You  will attend class if or when the instructor has excused absences.

XII H.    COMPUTER USAGE:  Students will be encouraged to use “Chem. Finder” and other Internet based sources to discover safety information on specific chemicals.  Computers will be required for certain laboratory experiments and specific kinds of calculations in lecture.  Students are required to have a calculator capable of scientific notation and log functions.

XII I.    Cellular Telephones:  All cell phones, pagers, alarms, musical devices, etc. must be turned off or on vibrate during all class meetings.  
            If a disruption occurs, especially during exams, the device may be confiscated.  

XIIIA.    CLINICAL/LABORATORY/FIELD-BASED EXPERIENCES:

Wednesday

Thursday

Activity

Aug. 24

Aug. 25

Safety discussion, Check-in

Aug. 31

Sept. 1

Density of a Regular Solid & an Irregular Solid    Practice problem

Sept. 7

Sept. 8

GLI-Moles

Sept. 14

Sept. 15

Determination of the Formula of a compund

Sept. 21

Sept. 22

How to Identify the Occurrence of a Chemical Reaction?

Sept. 28

Sept. 29

Gravimetric Determination of Hydration of Water

Oct. 5

Oct. 6

Determination of Molecular Weight by Dumas Method

Oct. 19

Oct. 20

Thermochemical Experiment

Oct. 26

Oct. 27

Emission (Line) Spectra

Nov. 2

Nov. 3

Periodicity

Nov. 16

Nov. 17

Inorganic Molecular Modeling (uses computers)
http://www.twcnet.edu/jrbaker/R-D/Inorganic/default.html

   

      
            Addendum:  For the laboratory you are required to have a laboratory research notebook and goggles.  Labs will be emailed to you so you bear the cost of printing.   Please note that a lab manual would cost >$70/year.  The on-line lab materials would cost $35/semester.  In addition you may purchase a laboratory apron from the bookstore.


XIIIB.     Lab Safety and Waste Disposal:  You must wear your goggles at all times in the laboratory.  Your feet must be covered (no flip flops or sandals).  
            There will be no food nor drink in the laboratory.  You must follow the wastes disposal procedures for each lab.  You must be clothed from your neck to your knees. Any violations of the above will result in a warning the first time;  a zero grade for the lab the second time.  A third violation results in permanent dismissal from the lab and failure for the course.


XIV.    DISABILITIES:  Every effort will be made to accommodate disabilities.  Please discuss your disability with your instructor during a private interview within the first week of class.

XV.   HONOR CODE:  Each student is expected to abide by the TWC Honor Code, particularly on examinations.  You will be expected to sign a pledge for each exam.  Specifically, you will not cheat in any manner before or during the exam.  Please review the Honor Code in the “Tennessee Wesleyan College Student Handbook 
& Calendar”.


        Penalties:  The first violation of the Honor Code will have the activity scored as a zero and the violation will be reported to the Academic Dean.   The second violation earns an F in the course.

XVI.    DATE OF REVISION: August 8, 2011        INITIALED BY: JRB