SPEECH 101 A &B: INTRODUCTION TO SPEECH: COURSE SYLLABUS*

*subject to change per my discretion: all changes will be announced in class and/or on the website

 

Department of Fine Arts—TENNESSEE WESLEYAN COLLEGE

 Course:       Introduction to Speech (3 hrs)

Location:    Section A: Durham 303 / Section B: Durham 201 

Term:                        Fall 2011

Instructor:  Dr. Eric Love, Assistant Professor of Theatre and Speech

Office:                        20B Townsend Hall

Phone:                        252-1125

E-mail:                         elove@twcnet.edu

Office Hrs:  All day Wednesdays (except lunch) and just about anytime I’m not in class as long as you make an appointment via email

 COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT: In keeping with the spirit of the liberal arts, Tennessee Wesleyan College seeks within the framework of the Judeo-Christian tradition to provide for students the highest quality educational experience, to promote personal responsibility, integrity, and purpose, and to prepare students for a life of leadership and service in an ever changing global community.

 COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING OUTCOMES:

1.      Use effectively the skills of reading, writing and speaking
2.      Recognize the issues that affect social and political behavior in their historical and cultural perspective.
3.      Recognize and analyze contributions of the arts and literature.
4.      Demonstrate mathematical computation skills, and basic computer applications skills and demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method.
5.      Think critically and develop a basis for effective judgment.
6.      Access and evaluate information and its sources and use information effectively to accomplish a purpose.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course offers a performance-oriented approach to public speaking and speech writing in academic, professional, personal, community situations, and working with groups. Students will learn that public speaking is omnipresent in their daily activities and is an efficacious tool for addressing issues, motivating action, enlightening themselves and others, and improving the community. Students will learn skills and strategies necessary to prepare and deliver informative, persuasive, motivational, personal narrative, and group speeches and performance.  The course emphasizes composing meaningful and coherent messages, conducting ethical and responsible research, working, writing, and speaking in collaborative situations, and developing exceptional presentational skills.

 COURSE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:

  • Helping students overcome fears related to public speaking and performance
  • Teaching a holistic, straightforward approach to preparing speeches for any occasion
  • Providing safe, nurturing environment for students to explore and hone presentational skills
  • Exploring the history and rhetoric of public speaking
  • Providing an ethical framework for research, oratory, and public discourse

 

 STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 

  • Students learn how to manage their apprehensions about performing in public
  • Students learn to build (research, outline, and organize) speeches for public performance
  • Students will understand public speaking in a historical and contemporary context
  • Students will be able to perform group, narrative, informative, and persuasive speeches
  • Students develop analytical and critical listening skills
  • Students acquire lifelong research, speaking, and performance ethics

 TEXTS: Required: Metcalfe, Sheldon. Building A Speech, 7th ed., Thomson/Wadsworth, 2010.

 COURSE SCHEDULE subject to change at the Instructor’s discretion:

Week # & Date

Class Date and Topics

Readings Prior to Class

1. Aug 15

8/18 Basics of this class, getting to know each other

Syllabi and defining and exploring “speech”

 

2.  Aug 22

8/23 Knowing audiences. Listen: speeches are dialogues! Making nerves work FOR you.

8/25 Personal narrative as theatre & speech

Chapter 1

Chapters 3 & 4

3.  Aug 29

8/30 PERFORM PERSONAL NARRATIVES—schedule TBA

9/1 PERFORM PERSONAL NARRATIVES—schedule TBA

Chapter 2

Chapter 5

4.  Sept 5

9/6 Ethics

9/8 NO CLASS

 

5.  Sept 12

9/13 Famous speeches and speakers

9/15 Are informative speeches inherently persuasive? Research: library field trip. Supporting materials

Chapter 6

Chapters 7-9

6.  Sept 19

9/20 Reviewing Unit 1

9/22 First Exam: Unit 1 & class notes

Review all reading listed above and class notes

7.  Sept 26

9/27 Topic, purpose and structure: Language and style.

9/29 Practice informative speeches

Chapter 15

8.  Oct 3

10/4 Perform informative speeches—schedule TBA

10/6 Perform informative speeches—schedule TBA

 

9.  Oct 10

10/11 Using A/V. Introductions, conclusions, transitions

10/13: FALL BREAK—NO CLASS

Ditto

10. Oct 17

10/18 Group Dynamics: Group work

10/20 Speaking for special occasions: Group work

Chapters 10-12

 

11. Oct 24

10/25 Persuasion: Group work

10/27 Perform group presentations

Chapters 18 & 19

 

12. Oct 31

11/1 Perform group presentations

11/3 NO CLASS—TAKE A BREAK!

Chapters 13 & 14

Chapters 16 & 17

13. Nov 7

11/8 Reviewing for Exam #2

11/10 Second Exam—Chapters 7-19 and class notes

Re-Read & Review Notes

14. Nov 14

11/15 NO CLASS: ASSESSMENT DAY

11/17 Prep for final speech: Motivational/Persuasive

 

 

15. Nov 21

 

11/22 BEGIN FINAL SPEECHES

11/24 NO CLASS: THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

 

16. Nov 28

11/29 FINISH FINAL SPEECHES

 

 

ADDITIONAL READINGS: Supplementary—on reserve: Taking Center Stage: Masterful Public Speaking Using Acting Skills You Never Knew You Had

 TOPICS/UNITS OF INSTRUCTION: This class covers the processes of intrapersonal, interpersonal, and collaborative public communication and performance. Each student delivers Narrative, Informative, Persuasive, and Collaborative speeches. Speeches require library and computer research, as well as clear, concise, and expressive writing skills. Students will learn, and at all times adhere to, ethical standards of discourse.

 METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND LEARNING: Lecture, discussion, rehearsals, texts, in-class group exercises, and videos will guide students through the course objectives. 

 COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND MEANS OF EVALUATION:

                  A.  Theory Requirements:

                        Outlines: Two Typed outlines are required for each speech

                        Quizzes:  Five “pop” reading quizzes in class                       

                        Exams:  Two Exams

  1. Practice Requirements:

#1: Narrative Speech

       #2: Informative Speech

       #3: Group Speech

       #4: Motivational/Persuasive Speech

 ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS:

ATTENDANCE POLICY: Attend all classes!

There are 3 kinds of absences: Excused, Qualified, and Unexcused.

  1. An excused absence results from one of two things: illness or death. That’s it.
  • Your first excused absence may be “pledged,” that is, you present a signed statement that you were, in fact, too ill to attend class. Subsequent absences for illness require a physician’s note stating that you must be excused. If I do not get a physician’s note, you receive an unexcused absence. No exceptions.
  • Absences for a death in the family require an obituary, or some other verification. If I do not get some kind of written verification, you receive an unexcused absence. No exceptions.

 2: A Qualified absence results from missing for a school-affiliated reason or a       religious reason. The most common qualified absence is for athletics.     

·      Absence for participation in sports will need verification from the coach.
·      ATHLETES—IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO EITHER PROVIDE ME WITH A LIST OF ALL OF YOUR POTENTIAL ABSENCES AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SEMESTER. Do not count on your coach to do it.
·      Also, an additional email reminder to me before each absence is the best way to insure that you are not mistakenly marked as having an unexcused absence.
·      If you miss because class is scheduled on a day that is a religious holiday in your tradition I require written verification that in your religion that particular day is a holiday.
3: An Unexcused absence is an absence for ANY other reason.
·      Unexcused reasons include: Car trouble, court dates, faulty alarm clocks, WORK/JOB, studying for tests in other classes, or ANYTHING not indicated as excused or qualified.
·      Do not be late. Coming to class late or leaving early is an UNEXCUSED absence.
·      Only two unexcused absences are permissible for this class.
·      Unexcused absences beyond two result in a five-point reduction from your final grade for each occurrence.  Missing several classes without a documented reason results in a failing grade.

 

CLASSROOM PROFESSIONALISM:
You will not chat with other students in the course of class unless it is during a small group exercise. You will not be disruptive in class. The use of cell phones, laptops, text messaging, iPods (or any entertainment/listening device) is off limits!

If you are disruptive or otherwise engage in unprofessional/inappropriate behavior in class I will deduct points off of your final grade per my discretion.

IF you talk, or text, or if your cell phone/pager/etc goes off during another student’s speech, I will deduct points from YOUR speech.

I have a 2-strike rule with text messaging in general:

I will give you TWO warnings not to text in class over the course of the semester. After that, I will deduct one point off of your final grade for each time I see you texting. I may not say anything to you, but simply keep knocking off points. Therefore, it is better not to do it in the first place.

ASSIGNMENTS AND POINT VALUES:

Speech #1: 5

Speech #2: 10

Speech #3: 15

Speech #4: 20

Test #1: 20

Test #2: 20

5 Reading Quizzes: 10

Professionalism: possible deductions for unprofessional/inappropriate behavior

TOTAL: 100 pts

 GRADING SCALE:

100-93=A            92-90 =A-          89-87=B+           86-82=B                   81-80=B-           79-77=C+                                77-72=C             71-70=C-            69-67=D+          66-62=D                   61-60=D-            Below 60=F       

 

PREPARATION

You are required to deliver four speeches; failure to do so will result in an “F” for your final grade. Evaluation is based on your skill in selecting and researching a topic, organizing and delivering your speeches, and following instructor requirements.  Evaluation is also by the criteria on the critique sheet (s), your ability to adapt while presenting the information orally, and by your adherence to time limits.

 If you do not begin and conclude your speech within the specified period, your delivery grade suffers.  The penalty is a 1-point deduction for every ten seconds that a speech is over or under time.

On the day you are to speak, you must turn in two typed copies of your outline.  One outline will be graded and returned to you along with a critique sheet for your oral speech.  If you fail to turn in both copies, you will receive a deduction. In short, no outline equals a lowered speech grade. You are required to complete all speeches in order to pass the course.

You must prepare an outline for each speech.  All written assignments are to be neatly typed, double-spaced on white paper with one-inch margins.  Follow current MLA or Chicago Manual of Style (CM) guidelines regarding fonts, headings, and pagination. Incomplete sentences and mistakes in grammar, punctuation, and spelling will adversely affect your grade.

 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

IF I FIND THAT YOU HAVE VIOLATED THE COLLEGE HONOR CODE IN THIS CLASS, YOU WILL RECEIVE AN IMMEDIATE “F” FOR THE COURSE AND I WILL REPORT YOU TO THE ACADEMIC DEAN’S OFFICE WHO WILL DETERMINE WHAT OTHER PENALTIES TO ASSESS.

To avoid the possibility of the use of recycled speech or paper files on campus and the downloading of speeches from the Internet, you must cite all sources used to prepare speeches.  This includes all titles and sites used in acquiring the notes.  Academic misconduct is not tolerated and is severely penalized according to the steps outlined in the student honor code.  A complete copy of the honor code is included in your student calendar/handbook.  EVERY examination and outline will carry the student’s written pledge and signature:

"I hereby certify that I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid on this paper.” 

The abbreviation “Pledged” followed by the student’s signature holds the same meaning and may be used on tests and papers other than final projects/examinations. You are to do your own work and not to work together except on the group project.

 NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY/Reasonable Accommodation: Any students who have a disability that may prevent them from fully demonstrating their abilities should contact the instructor as soon as possible for accommodations to ensure their full participation and to facilitate their educational opportunities.  In addition to the policy as defined on page 123 of the current student handbook, a student with a certified disability may ask for help by contacting the Academic Success Center.

 COURSE RELATIONSHIP TO MAJOR PROGRAM AND DEPARTMENT OR INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE: This is a required ACR course for all graduates of the college.

 COURSE RELATIONSHIP TO CONTENT AREA KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL FROM THE EDUCATION MATRICES:

GENERAL EDUCATION MATRIX:

A.  Ability to send and receive messages, written and oral, in Standard English;                                           ability to communicate verbally and non- verbally.                                                                                                                                                                  

B.  Understanding how nonverbal cues affect listening; as a speaker, the ability to use nonverbal cues in a positive way.    

  1. Ability to identify one’s intended audience and to communicate effectively with it when speaking or writing.
  2. Awareness of diverse communication styles, abilities, and cultural differences.

ENGLISH MATRIX: 

  1. Ability to demonstrate and encourage effective listening and writing skills.

 

ACTIVITIES PROMOTING COMPUTER LITERACY: Research for speeches provides students multiple opportunities to gain familiarity and facility with computers.  Computers are used for Internet research, text preparation, and visual aids, i.e., PowerPoint presentations.

 

COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING OUTCOMES

ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR COLLEGE-WIDE LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcome

Measurement

Assessment

Use effectively the communication skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening, and access and evaluate information and its sources and use information effectively to accomplish a purpose

 

Reading: Student reads the textbook, additional texts and research articles, and assignments.

Writing: Student completes written exams and provides outlines for each speech.

Speaking: Student performs four speeches in class.

Listening: Student will attend class, participate in lecture and exercises, and follow verbal instructions.

Accessing and evaluating information and its sources and using information effectively to accomplish a purpose: Students will use source material through research to accomplish the purpose of crafting an effective speech.

Student is assessed on the effectiveness of all of these skills through in-class speeches as well as two written exams.

 

IF YOU NEED ADDITIONAL HELP: Seek me out and/or visit the Academic Success Center!

Prepared by Dr. Eric Love, August 12, 2011