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Course Descriptions

CV 225 INTRODUCTION TO CHURCH VOCATIONS (3)
An introduction to opportunities for Christian ministry and service vocations as an ordained deacon or as a Christian lay person. Includes study of the meaning of ministry for both the ordained and the laity and opportunities and requirements for positions in church-related fields. Also includes a look at the church in the twenty- first century and its role in society. Guest speakers share their experience in ministry. (Fall, alternate years)

CV 227 MINISTRY SETTINGS AND ISSUES (3)
This course builds on Church Vocations I, preparing students for the tasks and practice of (lay) ministry, with attention given to worship, proclamation of the word, educational ministries, nurture and outreach programming, etc. Leadership in the church is a primary focus, with specific attention paid to the various roles and functions of the ministry, though the course might, on occasion, focus also on faith formation and approach leadership more theoretically. Prerequisite: CV 225 (Spring, alternate years)

CV 325, CV 327 CHURCH VOCATIONS PRACTICUM I, II (3, 3)
On-site work in and study of a local congregation or church institution, jointly supervised by college and congregational or institutional personnel. Each course requires 15 12-hour weeks or 4-1/2 40-hour weeks at the church or institution. Prerequisites: Six hours of Religious Studies, and permission of the instructor. (Alternate years)

PH 100 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3)
A study of the fundamental problems of philosophy and of the leading contemporary schools of philosophy. (Fall, Spring)

PH 101 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC AND RHETORIC (3)
An introduction to critical thinking as applied concretely to the everyday world of the student in such areas as ordinary conversations and the mass media. (Fall, alternate years)

PH 200 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3)
An introduction to the methods and language of ethics as applied specifically to major co temporary individual and social problems. (Spring)

PH 209 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES (3)
An examination of selected problems or movements of current interest, such as Existentialism, Phenomenology, Political Ethics, and Philosophy of Religion. (Fall, on demand)

PH 319r DIRECTED STUDIES: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY (3)
A critical investigation of major philosophers in one of the following periods: Ancient and Medieval; Renaissance through Nineteenth Century; Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: 3 hours at the 100 or 200 level. (Spring, on demand)

R 100 THE CHRISTIAN FAITH (3)
A study of the major elements of Christian theology and their historical development. Emphasis is placed on the basic issues involved in attaining a personal and mature Christian faith. (Fall)

R 101 INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE (3)
The study of the history and faith of the Jewish and Christian communities as expressed in the Old and New Testaments. Selected writings will be studied, with special emphasis given to understanding the historical and cultural context of these writings and to problems of interpretation. (Fall, Spring)

R 207 WORLD RELIGIONS (3)
A study of the great living religions of the world (Judaism and Christianity excepted), with their historical development and present trends. (Fall, alternate years)

R 209 RELIGION IN AMERICA (3)
This course will deal with the history, doctrine, and polity of (primarily) Christian religions in the United States. Denominational development will be given special consideration, but the study will not be limited to this; thus, historical and doctrinal models, apart from denominationalism, will also be studied. (Fall, alternate years)

R 211r CHRISTIANITY AND THE SOCIAL ORDER (3)
A survey of the application of basic Christian principles to the social, economic, and international relations of the social order. (Spring, alternate years)

R 219r DIRECTED STUDIES IN RELIGION I (1, 2, or 3)
Inquiry into selected issues in the field of religion or problems of interdisciplinary scope, as pursued through special reading-research projects or seminars. The subject matter will vary from year to year. (Spring, alternate years)

R 300 JESUS IN THE GOSPELS (3)
A study of Jesus as depicted in the gospels, with an evaluation of his significance for our day. (Fall, alternate years)

R 305 NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (3)
Special study of selected groups of New Testament writings—Pauline letters, Johannine literature, later epistles, and Revelation. (Spring, alternate years)

R 307 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY (3)
A study of selected parts of the Old Testament, such as the Pentateuch, Historical Books, the Prophets, and Wisdom Literature, with some attention to their contemporary applications. (On demand)

 
 

R 310 UNITED METHODIST HISTORY AND BELIEFS (3)
An examination of the theological beliefs of the Reverend John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, and his influence upon the beliefs of the contemporary United Methodist Church. (Fall, alternate years)

R 318 HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH (3)
A brief survey of the institutional and theological history of Christianity from the New Testament era to the contemporary period. (Spring)

R 319r DIRECTED STUDIES IN RELIGION II (1, 2, or 3)
Inquiry into selected issues in the field of religion or problems of interdisciplinary scope, as pursued through special reading-research projects or seminars. The subject matter will vary from year to year. (Spring, alternate years)

R 320r MODERN CHRISTIAN THOUGHT (3)
A comparison of several major systems of Christian theology and the exploration of some contemporary trends. The course is designed to show the broad divisions in theology and to introduce significant current issues. (Spring, on demand)

R 335*, R 336* NEW TESTAMENT GREEK I, II (3, 3)
Elementary Hellenistic Greek grammar oriented toward the reading of the Greek New Testament. Prerequisites: the completion of six hours in the department and permission of the instructor. (On demand)

R 445*, 446* READINGS IN NEW TESTAMENT GREEK I, II (1, 1)
Additional experience in translation and in using resources for philosophical study of the New Testament. Fulfillment of these two courses meets the language requirement for the Bachelor of Arts Degree. Prerequisites: R 335, 336 (New Testament Greek I, II) and permission of the instructor. (On demand)