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Course Descriptions

Courses numbered below 170 are designed for non-science majors and will not satisfy the major or minor in Biology.
B 101 FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOLOGY (4)
The most important generalizations of biology and the phenomena upon which they are based with particular emphasis on the universal phenomena characteristic of all living things; the fundamentals of plant and animal structure, nutrition, genetics, reproduction, and the integration of the organism as a whole. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. (Fall, Spring)

B 102 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (4)
An introduction to ecology and the environment of living organisms and their interactions. Includes a study of causes of environmental issues and the role of science in identifying and rectifying the problems. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. (Fall, Spring)

B 155 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I (4)
An introduction to the structure and functions of the mammalian body; includes discussions of general and biochemistry; cell biology; histology; and studies of the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Two hours of lecture and two 1.5-hour laboratories per week. (Fall)

B 156 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II (4)
A continuation of B155. The autonomic nervous, endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and digestive systems of the mammalian body are studied. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: B155 (Spring)

B 165 FUNDAMENTALS OF MICROBIOLOGY (4)
An introduction to the importance of bacteria, viruses, fungi, and multicellular parasites in human health and disease; classification, morphology, physiology, and interactions between microbes and their human hosts and microbes and the environment are examined. Three hours of lecture and two 1.5-hour laboratories per week. Prerequisites: B 101 or C 100 or permission of instructor. (Spring)

B 171 GENERAL BIOLOGY I: THE UNITY OF LIFE (4)
A study of cell structure and function common to life, emphasizing cell chemistry, energy transformations, reproduction, genetic mechanisms, and life’s origins. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. (Fall)

B 172 GENERAL BIOLOGY II: THE DIVERSITY OF LIFE (4)
A study of the diverse life forms including protistans, fungi, plants, and animals; how these organisms interact; and the environment in which these organisms evolved and live. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: B 171 (Spring)

B 221 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the medical terminology through the study of root words, prefixes and suffixes commonly used in medical fields. The course will emphasize etymology, definition, pronunciation and correct utilization of medical terms, which enables students to develop a vocabulary essential to the understanding of and communication with the various health areas in which allied health professionals will serve.

B 265 GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY (4)
An introduction to the classification, morphology, and physiology of protists, yeasts, bacteria, and viruses. Emphasis is on the bacteria. Three lectures and two 1.5-hour laboratories per week. Prerequisite: B171 (Spring)

B 270 PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS (4)
A study of the physical and chemical basis of heredity; the structure and function of the gene; the patterns of heredity in the individual and the population; and the kinds and sources of hereditary variation. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: B171 (Fall)

B 271 SEMINAR IN PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES (1)
Designed to aid students in the application process to professional schools (dental, medical, optometry, physical therapy, pharmacy, veterinary), including the selection, application, and interview processes. One hour of lecture per week. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Spring)

B 273 GENERAL BOTANY (4)
An introduction to the study of the structure, development, life cycles, physiology, and evolutionary and ecological relationships of the major groups of photosynthetic protistans; fungi; and non-vascular and vascular plants. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B 171, B 172 (Spring 2017 and alternate years thereafter.)

B 274 GENERAL ZOOLOGY (4)
An introduction to the study of the anatomy, physiology, phylogeny, and evolutionary and ecological relationships of animal-like protistans and representatives of the major animal phyla. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B 171, B 172 (Fall 2015 and alternate years thereafter.)

B 303 PLANT ANATOMY AND TAXONOMY (4)
A study of the morphology and evolution of the major taxa of vascular plants emphasizing how the various taxa of plant life affect humans and the environment; with a study of the systems of classification used to categorize flowering plants. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B171, B172 (Spring 2017 and alternate years thereafter.)

B 320 BIODIVERSITY (3)
An emphasis of the fundamental evolutionary and ecological concepts with respect to the diversity of life. Topics include the origin of life; systematic; prokaryotic and eukaryotic life forms; conservation of biodiversity. Special emphasis will be placed on plants and animals. Prerequisites: B171, B172 (On demand)

B 355 IMMUNOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the immune system focusing primarily on vertebrates, especially humans. Humoral and cellular mechanisms of innate and acquired immunity are covered. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: B265 (On demand)

B 360 PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (4)
A field-oriented course in environmental biology including a study of plant and animal communities. Emphasis is on interactions of organisms in nature. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B171, B172 (Fall)

B 384 VERTEBRATE ANATOMY AND DEVELOPMENT (4)
A comparative study of the anatomy and embryonic development of the vertebrates from both an evolutionary and functional perspective. Cat and dogfish sharks are dissected in laboratory. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B171, B172 (Fall 2015 and alternate years thereafter)

B 410 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4)
Chemical and physical activities of the plant: absorption; transpiration; mineral nutrition; photosynthesis; translocation; growth processes; discussions on the pharmaceutical uses of plants. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B 171, B172, C 101, C 102 (Spring 2016, alternate years thereafter)

B 421 BIOINFORMATICS (2)
An introduction to the mechanisms by which researchers capture and utilize genomic data. The course focuses on genomics and proteomics with an emphasis on how these fields are being used to diagnose, treat, and prevent disease. This course is taught online. Prerequisites: B171, B172, C101, C102, and M141 or higher (On demand)

B 450 EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (3)
An introduction to the processes of evolution. Topics include: population genetics, speciation, the origin of life, systematics, paleontology, history of life, and the origins of man. Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: B270, B320 and/or B360; restricted to 3rd and 4th year students. (Spring)

B 463 ADVANCED CELL BIOLOGY (4)
A detailed discussion of the molecular basis of cell structure and function including energy flow, metabolic pathways, cellular communication, and reproduction. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: B 171, B 172, C101, C102. Recommended: C 201, C 202 (Spring 2016 and alternate years thereafter). Formerly B463 Cellular and Molecular Biology.

B 465 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY(4)
A detailed discussion of the molecular mechanisms controlling cellular function with emphasis given to maintenance of DNA, information flow, genetic control mechanisms, DNA alteration and manipulation. Three hours of lecture and one three hour lab per week. Prerequisites: B 171, B 172, C101, C102. Recommended: C 201, C 202 (Spring 2017 and alternate years thereafter)

B 472 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY (4)
Examines physiological processes common to all animal species with special emphasis on the vertebrates. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: B171, B172, C101, C102 (Fall 2016 and alternate years thereafter)

B 479 VERTEBRATE ENDOCRINOLOGY (3)
The topics discussed include the morphology of endocrine glands and endocrine mechanisms in the regulation of homeostasis, morphogenesis, and functional integration in vertebrates. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: B 384 and/ or B 472; C101, C102 (On demand)

B 481 SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY I (I)
This course is designed to be the culmination of your experience as a student of biology. This course will begin by discussing in detail the types of scientific literature. You will then have the opportunity to choose an area of interest in the biological sciences and review the current research on your topic. This research will result in a poster presentation in a public forum. Prerequisites: Senior status

B482 SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY II (2)
This course (along with B 481) is designed to be the culmination of your experience as a student of biology. This course will continue your research into a current topic. Your research will ultimately result in a written review article and an oral presentation in a public forum. Prerequisites: B 481

C 100 INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY (4)
A study of three major areas of chemistry: general, organic, and biochemistry. Selected topics include nomenclature; chemical safety and handling; and chemical reactions. Does not prepare a student for General Chemistry. (Fall)

C 101 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (4)
A study of the fundamental concepts of atoms and molecules, periodic relationships, stoichiometry and chemical bonding with associated laboratory experiments. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite/Corequisite: M 141 or higher (Fall)

C 102 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (4)
A study of solutions, acids and bases, equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics and electrochemistry with some qualitative analysis in the laboratory experiments. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C 101 (Spring)

C 201 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (4)
A study of the compounds of carbon. Properties and reactions of organic compounds and functional groups are discussed in terms of modern structural theory. The laboratory consists of microscale preparation and study of reactions of typical carbon compounds; some instrumental methods of determination of structure and properties are used. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C 102 (Fall)

C 202 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (4)
A continuation of C201. Multi-step reactions and synthesis will be discussed. The laboratory consists of microscale multi-step synthesis, isolation, and identification techniques using infrared and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C 201 (Spring)

C 331 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS (5)
Gravimetric and volumetric determinations, stoichiometry of analytical chemistry and separations. Three hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C 202 (Fall 2015 and alternate years thereafter)

C 333 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS (4)
Consideration is given to instrumental design, theory and applications to chemical problems in potentiometric, electrogravimetric, coulometric, polarographic, and amperometric methods and optical and atomic spectroscopy and chromatographic separations. Three hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: C 331 and Prerequisite/Corequisite: M 182 (Spring 2016 and alternate years thereafter)

 
 

C 351 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3)
This course is designed to provide an advanced, focused approach to the properties of inorganic chemical systems. Specifically, we investigate the structures and reactivites of the ~100 elements utilized beyond the quintessential biological species (C, H, O, etc.). This will be accomplished via studies of chemical bonding theories, molecular structure, solid state structures, and molecular symmetries. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: C 202 (On demand)

C 362 BIOCHEMISTRY (4)
A study of fundamental biological processes in the context of chemical principles. Topics include the foundations of biochemistry; structure and catalysis of water, amino acids, and peptides; the structure of proteins; functions of proteins, enzymes; carbohydrates; lipids; and nucleic acids. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite: C 202 (Spring)

C 431 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I (4)
This course focuses on thermochemistry; enthalpy, and entropy; the laws of thermodynamics; kinetic theory of gases; and chemical kinetics. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: C 202, P 212 and M 182 (Fall 2016 and alternate years thereafter)

C 432 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II (4)
A study of Schrodinger equations; quantum mechanical postulates; vibration and rotation of molecules; the hydrogen atom and many electron atoms; and electronic spectroscopy. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: C 202, P 212 and M 182 (Spring 2017 and alternate years thereafter)

C 450 POLYMER CHEMISTRY (3)
An introduction to polymer chemistry including such topics as polymer nomenclature; characterization; physical and chemical properties of polymers; and polymerization reactions. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: C 202 (On demand)

C 481 SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY I (1)
This course is designed to be the culmination of your experience as a chemistry major. This course will give you an opportunity to explore a specific area of chemistry in detail. In this exploration, the student will review the current research being carried out in this area and present the findings in written, visual, and oral forms. Prerequisites: Senior Status

C 482 SEMINAR IN CHEMISTRY II (2)
This course will give you an opportunity to explore a specific area of chemistry in detail. In this exploration, you will review the current research being carried out in this area and present your findings in written, visual, and oral forms. Prerequisites: C 481